Graph pointing downward - The Center for Restorative Breast Surgery

Risk Of Contralateral Breast Cancer Is Falling

Risk Of Contralateral Breast Cancer Is Falling Contralateral (opposite) breast cancer has declined annually in the USA by approximately 3% from the mid-1980s to 2006. Multiple explanations have been put forth, including the use of tamoxifen in the 1980s and 90s, aromatase inhibitors (anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane) in the early 2000s, a shift toward taxanes (Taxol…

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Diagram of Lymph Nodes - Center for Restorative Breast Surgery

Surgery On The Axillary Lymph Nodes Continues To Evolve

Surgery On The Axillary Lymph Nodes Continues To Evolve The modern era of lymph node surgery began at the turn of the last century with a surgeon named William Halstead. He developed a breast cancer procedure that included removing the breast, chest wall muscles, and the underarm lymph nodes (axillary lymph nodes). It included the…

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Is Mammographic Breast Density Related To Blood Hormone Levels - X-Ray Image - The Center for Restorative Breast Surgery

Is Mammographic Breast Density Related To Blood Hormone Levels?

Is Mammographic Breast Density Related To Blood Hormone Levels? Mammographic breast density (MD) refers to the amount of breast and fibrous tissue seen on a mammogram compared to fatty tissue. For instance, the mammogram on the left shows mostly fatty tissue seen as primarily grey. On the other hand, the mammogram on the right indicates…

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Low Risk Of Recurrence In Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy For DCIS

Low Risk Of Recurrence In Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy For DCIS Ductal carcinoma in situ (also called DCIS) is breast cancer, which has not invaded outside of the primary milk ducts. Consequently, it has no way to spread to other parts of the body or the lymph nodes. The reported cure rate for women diagnosed with DCIS…

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Breast Cancer Incidence Rising As Plunge In Death Rate Begins To Slow

Breast Cancer Incidence Rising As Plunge In Death Rate Begins To Slow There are currently 3.8 million women with a history of breast cancer living in the United States. Since 1989 the death rate has plunged 40%. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), these gains have begun to slow. Spokesmen for the ACS suggest…

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